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Households accounts...


... tell the story of wellbeing of the citizens in the world.

Growth Incidence Curves


Long-run growth does not benefit all to the same extent
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Historical Household Budgets

Two Centuries of Well-being, Poverty and Inequality Around the World.

The Historical Household Budgets (HHB) project is an investigation of the long-run evolution of living standards around the world on the basis of household budgets. The HHB database contains hundreds of thousands of family-level records, covers two centuries (1800-today), and embraces the five continents of the globe. HHB researchers are interested in monetary indicators – income, wealth and expenditure, wages and prices – as well as in non-monetary dimensions of well-being, such as health and education outcomes, labor force participation, dwelling characteristics, and many others. This website is the official HHB hub, where data and sources are housed and made available, innovative methods and new findings are publicized. The writing of a new history of the well-being of world citizens has begun: all scholars are invited to join the HHB project and contribute to the on-going research. Inquire within.

Household Budgets Map


We have just updated our database and added new budgets. Browse the HHB map!

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Latest news

Culture, values and household budgets

Jan. 18, 2017

    The HHB team will meet today with researchers led by Prof. Sebastiano Bavetta (University of Palermo). The plan is to discuss the use of historical household budgets as a source for investigating values, culture and social norms throughout history. Take a look at the programme

    Professor Tony Atkinson

    Jan. 3, 2017

      It is with great sadness that we learnt of the passing of Professor Tony Atkinson, Fellow of Nuffield College, University of Oxford, Centennial Professor at The London School of Economics and member of the HHB Advisory Board. Few scholars can claim to have had a greater impact on their discipline than Tony Atkinson did. He was a model of dedication and integrity for all of us. At this time of sorrow, our thoughts are with Professor Atkinson's family.

      The HHB Workig Paper series now on RePEc

      Nov. 30, 2016

        You can now download the HHB-WPS from REPEC services. The project is proud to be part of the  2Million+ pieces that contribute to the dissemination of on-going research in economics. Read us on IDEAS, EconPapers etc..
        http://econpapers.repec.org/paper/hbuwpaper/
        https://ideas.repec.org/s/hbu/wpaper.html

        The HHB project is delighted to welcome Professor Sebastiano Bavetta (University of Palermo) as a HHB fellow.

        Nov. 28, 2016

          Sebastiano Bavetta is Professor of Economics at the Università di Palermo (Italy) and visiting professor at the University of Pennsylvania (USA) where he teaches 'Economics of Freedom' in the Philosophy, Politics and Economics Program. He received his PhD in the Philosophy of Economics from the London School of Economics and Political Science. His research interests have been concerned with issues in positive and normative economics and in political theory. He has published several books, including The Economics of Freedom, with Pietro Navarra (Cambridge University Press, 2012). His work has also appeared in several journals including Social Choice and Welfare, the ...

          HHB new Working Paper

          Nov. 11, 2016

            “Between World War I and World War II, at the height of Fascism, droves of Italians abandoned the countryside and small villages to converge on the big cities of the centre and north of the country. […] Previously unpublished documentation found in Rome’s Capitoline Archives provides us with a very detailed view of the dual phenomenon of internal immigration and spontaneous slum settlements in Rome during Fascism.”

             

            The HHB working paper no.6 is an invitation to explore the roots of Rome’s informal settlements.

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